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Category: Digital Past

Reflections on a Semester in the Digital Past

Reflections on a Semester in the Digital Past

The assignment: At the completion of the semester, you will write a reflective essay that summarizes your learning and growth during the class. These essays should be no more than 2,000 words. This is a chance for you to process your work and to consider the ways that it will contribute to your future ventures. This is my last assignment of 2016. We finally made it.

Reviewing other works for HIST 5953 and not understanding the Internet.

Reviewing other works for HIST 5953 and not understanding the Internet.

Part of our assignment for this week–in addition to continuing to be the diligent and thoughtful students that we’re definitely, totally being on our projects–was to review another student’s website. Without posting the full review here, I was assigned Natalie Russell and Nick Ostermann’s site on the Gens de Couleur. They’re making an intriguing argument about the role free people of color (FPC) played in antebellum New Orleans and in turn demonstrating how they “whitened” themselves in official portraits and…

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Democratic Counties, Black Voters: A Map of the South in the Election of 1896

Democratic Counties, Black Voters: A Map of the South in the Election of 1896

The map I’ve embedded below displays a combination of the 1890 census data by percentage African American with the percentage of each county voting Democratic in the election of 1896. The darker purple a county is, the more African American and Democrat-voting it was. The map is enabled to toggle between four different layers, which I’ll briefly describe: county_plus_vote is the layer which forms the blue chloropleth gradient in the legend. The darker blue a county, the higher percentage Democrat it…

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African Americans and the Election of 1896, Reviewing Omeka, and Stephen Berry on DH for Grad Students

African Americans and the Election of 1896, Reviewing Omeka, and Stephen Berry on DH for Grad Students

Over three decades removed from emancipation, in 1896 African-Americans began to move out of virtually one-party allegiance toward the Republican Party and consider allying themselves with the Democratic Party. Why? I am studying African-Americans’ role in the election of 1896, because I want to find out who supported William Jennings Bryan and why, in order to understand African-Americans’ relationship to populism and the Democratic Party of the 19th century. That was nice and formal. That cartoon, on the whole, makes…

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Reviewing “Visualizing Emancipation”

Reviewing “Visualizing Emancipation”

Published in 2012 by the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond, Visualizing Emancipation is a interactive digital project “mapping the interactions between federal policies, armies in the field, and the actions of enslaved men and women on countless farms and city blocks.” Geared toward scholars, students, and teachers alike, Visualizing Emancipation provides a geographic examination of emancipation during and after the Civil War, Various sections of the website serve as a digital narrative, teaching resource, and data set. First…

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Away we go!

Away we go!

We have a visiting professor from George Mason, Dr. Sharon Leon, at Marquette. She’s teaching HIST 5953, The Digital Past, in which we learn how to research, navigate, and create history online. This class involves absolutely no textbooks; instead, Dr. Leon required us to purchase a one-year domain name. As part of both this class and my “professional internship” with the Marquette Digital Scholarship Lab, I am apparently now an historian-in-training online. So for at least this semester and probably…

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